After #MeToo: Healing From the Trauma of Sexual Assault

People carry signs addressing the issue of sexual harassment at a #MeToo rally outside of Trump International Hotel on December 9, 2017, in New York City. (Photo: Stephanie Keith / Getty Images)

With about 19 million viewers watching, the demonstration of solidarity at Sunday’s Golden Globe awards ceremony offered the largest platform to address sexual violence since the #MeToo movement began on social media. But recognizing this crisis is only half the battle, because for many the aftermath of sexual assault is just the beginning of a lifetime of healing.

Activists carry signs opposing sexual harassment at a #MeToo rally outside of Trump International Hotel on December 9, 2017, in New York City. (Photo: Stephanie Keith / Getty Images)

On Sunday the red carpet of the 2018 Golden Globe Awards was not the usual sea of dazzling gowns and blinding jewelry. Instead, a shadow of black engulfed the night. Actresses alongside activists wore black as a proclamation of solidarity with sexual assault survivors within the entertainment industry and workplaces across the country. Connected to the “blackout” was Time’s Up, a movement aimed at ending sexual violence and inequality in the workplace. The initiative aims to bridge the gap between Hollywood players and those who experience sexual assault from less privileged backgrounds.

“Time’s Up is a unified call for change from women in entertainment for women everywhere,” states its website. “From movie sets to farm fields to boardrooms alike, we envision nationwide leadership that reflects the world in which we live.”

With about 19 million viewers watching, the awards ceremony offered perhaps the largest platform to address sexual violence since the #MeToo movement began on social media. But recognizing this crisis is only half the battle, because for many the aftermath of …read more

Via:: Truthout

      

, ,

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply